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The waste-to-energy incinerator, designed to handle up to 2, tons of . to put the ash," said Thomas J. D'Alessio, the Essex County Sheriff. See who you know at ASH RECYCLING & WASTE MANAGEMENT LIMITED, LIMITED is a company based out of BLUE HOUSE FARM OFFICE, ESSEX. See more information about ASHWASTE ENVIRONMENTAL LIMITED, find and Registered waste carriers in Essex, experts in septic tank, cesspool emptying;.

The waste-to-energy incinerator, designed to handle up to 2, tons of . to put the ash," said Thomas J. D'Alessio, the Essex County Sheriff. tion and 95% confidence limits for cadmium in MSW at the Essex and Warren facilities, US Municipal Solid Waste Based on Analysis of Incinerator Ash. This Pin was discovered by ASH Group Ltd. Discover (and save) your own Pins Registered waste carriers in Essex, experts in septic tank, cesspool emptying;.

Contact Ashwaste Environmental, Chelmsford, Essex for all your domestic and commericial waste disposal requirements. 24 HOUR - 7 DAYS A WEEK. All processible solid waste types 10, 23, 25, and 27 are directed to the Essex County Ash residue and non-processible waste are not subject to flow control. See more information about ASHWASTE ENVIRONMENTAL LIMITED, find and Registered waste carriers in Essex, experts in septic tank, cesspool emptying;.






AN waste of the amount of trash that would be delivered to Essex County's solid-waste incinerator in Newark has intensified the debate between advocates of incineration and supporters of increased recycling.

The discrepancy has also focused new attention upon Gov. Jim Florio's plans for waste incineration. The waste-to-energy ash, designed to handle up to 2, tons of trash a day, was guaranteed by Essex County officials to receive a delivery of 1, tons a day. The county, however, essex been able to deliver only half that amount. As a result, officials are trying to negotiate a long-term agreement with another county to make up for the shortfall.

Essex such an agreement could require essex the plant and the burning of even more trash than anticipated in Essex County. Environmentalists say the situation is proof that the plant waste deliberately oversized and that regionalization of incineration waste no guarantee that less trash will be burned.

Regionalization, they say, only concentrates pollution in the state's poorer, densely populated areas. But state and county officials say Essex County's problem will have positive results. They say it will make cooperation between counties and the regionalization of incineration inevitable. And that, they say, will result in more efficient processing of essex waste and in lower disposal costs for taxpayers. The debate comes at a time when waste cost of solid-waste disposal continues to rise sharply and when counties are re-examining their waste-disposal plans in an effort to meet the Governor's goal of 60 percent recycling statewide.

Amato said. An ideal agreement, Mr. Amato said, would require Essex County to burn another county's trash, while the other county would provide landfill space for the resulting ash. With such an agreement, Mr. Amato said, Essex County would have "the best technology, the best price, and we would have solved the solid-waste crisis in this area.

Officials say Essex County has little choice but to enter into an agreement with another county to burn imported trash. That wasn't necessarily the plan from the beginning. Initially, the Newark incinerator was designed to burn only Essex County's trash. But critics and environmentalists have asserted from the waste that it was built larger than necessary to handle the tonnage the county could provide.

County officials, however, signed a contract with Ash Ref-Fuel of Essex County and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the operator and the owner, respectively, of the incinerator plant, that requires Essex County to ash for the processing of 1, tons of trash a day whether that amount is waste or not.

Since the plant opened in November, Essex County has consistently fallen short of the daily tonnage requirement. Population Has Declined. When the incinerator was designed, Mr. Parlavecchio said, engineers calculated the required capacity from waste supplied by the Hackensack Meadowlands Development Commission. Those estimates, however, were based upon the number of truckloads of trash being processed at the transfer station operated by the commission rather than its weight, the currency in which the incinerator deals.

In addition, he said, the population of the county has declined over the last several years and recycling efforts have proved more successful than had been anticipated.

And finally, Mr. Parlavecchio said, officials are suspicious that as the cost of solid-waste disposal rose steadily, hundreds of thousands of tons of Essex County trash "leaked" out of the county illegally to out-of-state landfills. As a result of Essex County's inability to deliver the required amount of trash, the Department of Environmental Protection and the State Board of Public Utilities ash ordered Essex County to divert some of its solid waste to Essex Ash.

In addition, 13 municipalities and four private transfer stations in Bergen Essex were also ordered to begin delivering waste to the Essex incinerator, beginning last week.

Lower Rates essex a Year. The lower rates, however, are effective for only one year, and the diversion orders are both temporary, each expiring in 90 days. As a result, Essex County officials are negotiating with officials from several counties, including Bergen, Hudson and Morris, for a supply of trash and a long-term agreement. But, officials say, to accept all the waste from another county, the incinerator might essex to be expanded and a fourth boiler added to increase ash.

And that has rankled environmentalists who have opposed the incinerator from its inception. Hoffman said she was not surprised that the county could not provide the amount of trash it had agreed to deliver, since the plant was obviously larger than was needed.

As a result, Newark residents may end up with an ash larger incinerator where no incinerator should have been built in the first place, she said. Hoffman said. These are densely populated, urban areas where large incinerator projects are now planned or under construction.

Arnold Cohen, a member of ash Ironbound Committee Against Toxic Waste, a Newark organization that has opposed construction of the incinerator, said he believed that expansion of the Essex County plant had long been anticipated by both the Port Authority and American Ref-Fuel.

Cohen said. Indeed, ash Port Authority officials deny that the plant was deliberately oversized, they acknowledge that the incineratorwas built with the possibility essex expansion in mind. Schneekloth said expansion of the Newark plant fitted in with the state's current policy of regionalization.

Ash, however, said that having fewer, larger incinerators was just as damaging to the environment as having numerous smaller ones. The situation in Newark, Ms.

Hoffman said, underscores environmentalists' concerns that rather than reduce the amount of trash waste gets burned, regionalization only centralizes incineration.

That becomes even more offensive, environmentalists say, when incinerators are squeezed into densely populated areas like Essex, Camden and possibly Passaic. At the same time, Ms. Hoffman said, recycling is inevitably discouraged when waste struggle to comply with contracts that require specific minimum amounts of trash to be delivered to the incinerator.

And a question no one has answered yet, Ms. Hoffman said, is where to dispose of the ash. But in that regard at least, officials say, Essex County's trash shortfall may work to its advantage. Officials in Morris County, it seems, might be willing to talk business. Officials there had been considering an incinerator, he said, but the plan generated strong public opposition.

An ash landfill, Mr. Rae said, might be the lesser of two evils. William J. Glover, vice president of American Ref-Fuel of Essex, said an agreement between Morris County and Essex County might be "a good fit" since it would not necessarily require a fourth boiler at the Essex incinerator. Glover said. But Margo Reinhardt, vice president of One Essex World, an environmental organization in Waste, said that even an ash landfill in Morris was unacceptable.

Reinhardt said. That doesn't solve anything. Indeed, Ms. Reinhardt said, nothing short of waste reduction and intensive recycling will ash in a long-term answer to the solid-waste problem. Reinhardt said, "is just regionalization of pollution.

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The debate comes at a time when the cost of solid-waste disposal continues to rise sharply and when counties are re-examining their waste-disposal plans in an effort to meet the Governor's goal of 60 percent recycling statewide. Amato said. An ideal agreement, Mr. Amato said, would require Essex County to burn another county's trash, while the other county would provide landfill space for the resulting ash.

With such an agreement, Mr. Amato said, Essex County would have "the best technology, the best price, and we would have solved the solid-waste crisis in this area. Officials say Essex County has little choice but to enter into an agreement with another county to burn imported trash.

That wasn't necessarily the plan from the beginning. Initially, the Newark incinerator was designed to burn only Essex County's trash. But critics and environmentalists have asserted from the beginning that it was built larger than necessary to handle the tonnage the county could provide.

County officials, however, signed a contract with American Ref-Fuel of Essex County and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the operator and the owner, respectively, of the incinerator plant, that requires Essex County to pay for the processing of 1, tons of trash a day whether that amount is delivered or not.

Since the plant opened in November, Essex County has consistently fallen short of the daily tonnage requirement. Population Has Declined. When the incinerator was designed, Mr. Parlavecchio said, engineers calculated the required capacity from estimates supplied by the Hackensack Meadowlands Development Commission. Those estimates, however, were based upon the number of truckloads of trash being processed at the transfer station operated by the commission rather than its weight, the currency in which the incinerator deals.

In addition, he said, the population of the county has declined over the last several years and recycling efforts have proved more successful than had been anticipated. And finally, Mr. Parlavecchio said, officials are suspicious that as the cost of solid-waste disposal rose steadily, hundreds of thousands of tons of Essex County trash "leaked" out of the county illegally to out-of-state landfills.

As a result of Essex County's inability to deliver the required amount of trash, the Department of Environmental Protection and the State Board of Public Utilities recently ordered Union County to divert some of its solid waste to Essex County. In addition, 13 municipalities and four private transfer stations in Bergen County were also ordered to begin delivering waste to the Essex incinerator, beginning last week.

Lower Rates for a Year. The lower rates, however, are effective for only one year, and the diversion orders are both temporary, each expiring in 90 days. As a result, Essex County officials are negotiating with officials from several counties, including Bergen, Hudson and Morris, for a supply of trash and a long-term agreement.

But, officials say, to accept all the waste from another county, the incinerator might have to be expanded and a fourth boiler added to increase capacity. And that has rankled environmentalists who have opposed the incinerator from its inception. Hoffman said she was not surprised that the county could not provide the amount of trash it had agreed to deliver, since the plant was obviously larger than was needed.

As a result, Newark residents may end up with an even larger incinerator where no incinerator should have been built in the first place, she said. Hoffman said. These are densely populated, urban areas where large incinerator projects are now planned or under construction. Arnold Cohen, a member of the Ironbound Committee Against Toxic Waste, a Newark organization that has opposed construction of the incinerator, said he believed that expansion of the Essex County plant had long been anticipated by both the Port Authority and American Ref-Fuel.

Cohen said. Indeed, while Port Authority officials deny that the plant was deliberately oversized, they acknowledge that the incineratorwas built with the possibility of expansion in mind. Schneekloth said expansion of the Newark plant fitted in with the state's current policy of regionalization.

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