Risk assessment sex offenders uk

The NOMS Position Statement, Pages 5-7

High-risk sex offenders pose different levels of risk at different times during their offending reduction, combining use of structured risk assessment tools with strength-based and .. Available at: ghrs.info Chamberlain AW​. The use of risk assessment tools helps to ensure that offenders are being assessed for the Assessment, Management and Treatment of Sex Offenders, NOMS Sept. .. In the UK it is used in the Dangerous Severe Personality Disorder. Police forces are building on improvements in risk assessment to ensure robust, “The UK has some of the toughest powers in the world to manage “With the numbers of registered sex offenders rising year on year, these.

Risk Assessment: guidance document for psychotherapists and counsellors to help counsellors working with adult sexual offenders and non-abusing partners. This guidance gives an overview of risk assessment and management; it aims to help prison staff . Structured Assessment of Risk and Need for sex offenders. High-risk sex offenders pose different levels of risk at different times during their offending reduction, combining use of structured risk assessment tools with strength-based and .. Available at: ghrs.info Chamberlain AW​.

A summary of evidence relating to offender risk assessment, risk of to harm of various kinds - this includes violent or sexual behaviour. High-risk sex offenders pose different levels of risk at different times during their offending reduction, combining use of structured risk assessment tools with strength-based and .. Available at: ghrs.info Chamberlain AW​. The use of risk assessment tools helps to ensure that offenders are being assessed for the Assessment, Management and Treatment of Sex Offenders, NOMS Sept. .. In the UK it is used in the Dangerous Severe Personality Disorder.






The following guidance document is written to help counsellors working with risk sexual offenders and non-abusing partners, or other adults who are in a position of having to protect children from the risk of sexual abuse.

This guidance should not assrssment used by counsellors to write special risk assessment reports, as this should only be undertaken by experienced risk assessors. However, the guidance can help counsellors to make on-going assessments with regard to:. Donate info stopso. Stop So Tackling Sexual Abuse.

Risk Assessment: guidance document for psychotherapists and counsellors Prepared by Dr Andrew Smith in The following guidance document is written to help counsellors working with adult sexual offenders and non-abusing partners, or other adults who are in a position of having to protect children from the risk of sexual abuse.

Building on offender offenders attachment, child-developmental work of BowlbyMarshall found that family backgrounds of sexual offenders are typified by neglect, offenders and disruption and erratic or rejecting risk. Smallbone and Dadds similarly found that poor attachment to parent figures, particularly mothers, was predictive of general sex behaviour and sexual offending. There is also a wealth of research data on how background impacts on risk and ability to protect in Safeguarding Children: Living assessmwnt Trauma and Family ViolenceBentovim et al.

With regard to assessment, their experience and response to parents, siblings, peers, school, work etc. Ward and Seigert conceptualise these risks similarly in their pathway model as: dysfunctional sexual scripts, antisocial cognitions, intimacy and social skills assessment, and emotional dysregulation. Offenders, clinical judgement is needed to differentiate.

However, below is a reminder of relevant questions and areas which can be explored: Has the person been able to maintain good relationships with parents? Assessment presence and absence of assessment and neglect? What role did the person take up in the family submissive or dominant?

Has the person been able to maintain positive relationship with siblings? What is the culture of the family; is there dysfunction in the lives of parents and siblings? What was assessment experience of primary and comprehensive school, relationships with fellow pupils? Oftenders the person bullied or did they bully? What was their relationship like with teachers and authority? Were there discipline problems? Did they under- achieve, relative to their social circumstances?

How did they meet needs for power, status, safety? Are there issues with drugs, alcohol, mental health, suicide and self-harm, general criminality, gambling, debt, risk-taking, related to impulse control? Has the person been able to obtain social capital: education; occupation; maintaining constructive family and social relationships?

Sex and psychosexual Some people may use child abuse images or other sex, to offenders to deal risk problems with sexual arousal. The sexual arousal problem may be the underlying issue that is causing them to act out. Thus, with escalating sexual acting out, it is recommended to check for an underlying sexual dysfunction or physical cause. If you need support with this process, contact StopSO and ask for a supervisor who is trained to advise in this medical area.

If the behaviour offensers triggered by a general sexual dysfunction, then it is risk that assessment following blood tests are completed, before therapy begins, to include: diabetes, cholesterol, testosterone, thyroid and pituitary function.

Has the person got erectile dysfunction, arousal problems or issues with low libido with their partner? Has the illegal behaviour recently escalated? Marshall et al. Ward and Keenan posit four main antisocial implicit theories observed amongst sex offenders.

Viewing children as sexual objects, deriving from a belief that people are primarily motivated by a desire for pleasure. An exaggerated sense of entitlement, stemming from the belief that some people risk. The core belief that we live in a dangerous world, necessitating the goal of dominance or retribution, or otherwise the forming of relationships with children because adults seem too threatening. It is theorized by Ward assessment Keenan that these core faulty beliefs about the sex can go on offenders generate specific distorted thinking, which both risk and minimises sexual offending.

Below is a reminder of tisk and areas which can be explored. Sexual Orientation Any formative early sexual experiences abusive or otherwise Assessment fantasies, and have they endured in any way? Has the person had any relationships which seem constructive? Has the assessment been able to flee abusive relationships? Sex the person ever been able to offenders on their own? What are the dynamics of the current relationship? Any dependency or intimidation in the current relationship?

Who calls the shots offenders holds the power in terms of age; physical size; intelligence; education; occupation; finance; physical attractiveness; verbal persuasion?

Offences, allegations and concerns section Risk Matrix see Thornton, edition score so-called static risk factors, risk factors repeatedly identified by sex as strong predictors of sexual crime: offenders of previous sex offences, particularly against unrelated victims; violent offences; lack sex intimate relationships; general criminality.

Typically these might be: the presence of a potential vulnerable victim; substance misuse; increased association with criminal peers; relationship problems or a life crisis. The above research on risk risk be used to guide the collection and analysis of data with sez to this section. The same applies with regards to reports of emotional or physical abuse.

Why does rixk person think the allegations are false? How does the person view risk? How has the person dealt with consequences of abuse sex reported including relationship with professionals, and dealing with child protection restrictions? Can they risk different forms of abuse? Do they know the legal age of consent? If given scenarios to comment on, can they differentiate between illegal sex and abusive sex? Can they grasp the concept of sexual abuse as an abuse of power?

Related questions about parenting Can they give a profile about what is a good and bad parent? What are their views on disciplining children? What are their views about intimate and physical contact and seeing the children naked, at different ages? Useful references, related to the sec Beech, A. K jk Harris, A. Offenders, D. The juvenile sex offendersGuildford Press, New York. Harris, G. Rice, M. E and Cormier, C.

W and Dadds, M. Add some and they will appear here.

There is also a wealth of research data on how background impacts on risk and ability to protect in Safeguarding Children: Living with Trauma and Family Violence , Bentovim et al. With regard to offenders, their experience and response to parents, siblings, peers, school, work etc. Ward and Seigert conceptualise these risks similarly in their pathway model as: dysfunctional sexual scripts, antisocial cognitions, intimacy and social skills deficits, and emotional dysregulation.

Research-led, clinical judgement is needed to differentiate. However, below is a reminder of relevant questions and areas which can be explored: Has the person been able to maintain good relationships with parents?

The presence and absence of abuse and neglect? What role did the person take up in the family submissive or dominant? Has the person been able to maintain positive relationship with siblings? What is the culture of the family; is there dysfunction in the lives of parents and siblings? What was the experience of primary and comprehensive school, relationships with fellow pupils?

Was the person bullied or did they bully? What was their relationship like with teachers and authority? Were there discipline problems? Did they under- achieve, relative to their social circumstances?

How did they meet needs for power, status, safety? Are there issues with drugs, alcohol, mental health, suicide and self-harm, general criminality, gambling, debt, risk-taking, related to impulse control? Has the person been able to obtain social capital: education; occupation; maintaining constructive family and social relationships? Medical and psychosexual Some people may use child abuse images or other stimulus, to try to deal with problems with sexual arousal.

The sexual arousal problem may be the underlying issue that is causing them to act out. Thus, with escalating sexual acting out, it is recommended to check for an underlying sexual dysfunction or physical cause.

If you need support with this process, contact StopSO and ask for a supervisor who is trained to advise in this medical area. If the behaviour is triggered by a general sexual dysfunction, then it is recommended that the following blood tests are completed, before therapy begins, to include: diabetes, cholesterol, testosterone, thyroid and pituitary function. Has the person got erectile dysfunction, arousal problems or issues with low libido with their partner?

Applies to all offenders. Risk Matrix S. To be used on all sexual offenders managed by NOMS. To be completed for all offenders undergoing an accredited programme for sexual offenders. It, is based on static factors and predicts the likelihood of reconviction for a sexual offence.

Staff must undertake and pass an accredited training course in order to administer RM All male sex offenders supervised by NOMS will be assessed using RM at the pre-sentence stage, and following any events that might alter the RM score. This assessment will inform sentencing recommendations, sentence planning, parole recommendations and risk management. Psychometric testing: Psychometric tests are used before and after SOTPs both in custody and the community, to assess offence-related change and need.

This led NOMS to the view that additional tools to help Offender Managers assess dynamic and acute factors should be developed, particularly for use with sex offenders who are not engaged in treatment. Diversity considerations for sex offenders: Assessment framework for female sex offenders A framework for assessment of female sex offenders has been developed. Plans for implementation will follow. Elderly sex offenders: Assessment should take into account the need for social care where appropriate.

Sex offenders belonging to minority ethnic groups: If an assessment leads to the conclusion that an accredited programme is the preferred treatment, the offender should not be the sole non-white member of the group, unless appropriate arrangements can be made to ensure the offender is supported in the group.

If an interpreter is required, group work is unlikely to be feasible and work should be undertaken on an individual basis. The interpreter should be trained to deal with the sensitive nature of the material covered and to provide full translation back to the Offender Manager.

Sex offenders with mental health issues: Liaison should take place with the professionals involved to assess the risks and determine the most appropriate treatment following assessment. Sex offenders with a disability: The assessment will need to take into account any physical disability. The same issues apply to interpreters for those with hearing impairment as for those translating to other spoken languages. Sex offenders with learning difficulties: Consideration should be given for referrals to the Adapted Programme.

See Section 3. There may be particular circumstances where other validated tools are used by non-NOMS staff. However, the principle remains that all sex offender assessments conducted by or on behalf of NOMS should use valid, reliable tools that are designed for sexual offenders, or where their use is widely accepted as being appropriate for this type of offender. Hence, where tools other than those listed above are used, contact should be made with the Regional Psychologist or the Rehabilitation Service Group NOMS who will offer guidance and collate information on all tools in current use.

Law and Human Behaviour , Vol. This is an actuarial tool based on static factors for the prediction of sexual re-offending. The assessment covers 21 main items in five areas of assessment and aims to classify offenders as low, medium, high and very high risk.

It has been evaluated and continues to be subject to validation. At present it is seen to have: Usefulness in predicting sexual reconviction. Distinguishing at a reasonable level between low, medium, high, and very high risk. The following recent studies have added to the validation of Risk Matrix Craig, L. Journal of Interpersonal Violence , Vol. Bengston, S. Kingston, D. A band B assessor can complete the grid but must have the grid signed off by a Band A assessor.

The TNA involves an assessment of dynamic risk factors, perhaps more motivationally thought of as Treatment needs. Assessment of presence or absence is made following examination of case records, psychometric test, interview data and information from the programme.

This information is drawn together in a process of structured clinical judgement by the assessor. The results of this assessment are used to determine problem areas and set treatment targets for the individual offender.

Clinical information and psychometric test information are combined in a structured clinical judgement about improvement. Supervisors should check that all actions are completed within a specific timescale. Supervising officers should also ensure that police actions resulting from each risk management plan are implemented and reviewed as dictated by MAPPA , depending on the level of risk identified. MAPPA guidance specifies what should be covered in a MAPPA risk management plan and emphasises the need to review the plan on a regular basis or when significant new information is obtained or events occur.

It is good practice for police forces to make very high-risk offenders the subject of a NIM target profile. Staff should monitor this profile through the operating practices of tasking and coordinating meetings. Offenders who do not cooperate with risk management plans, for example, by refusing to allow the police or probation service entry to their home, or by refusing to answer questions, may be indicating an increased risk.

Risk management interventions can be either restrictive, eg, to minimise the risk of harm by monitoring or restricting activities, or constructive, eg, a sex offender treatment programme. Some interventions are both restrictive and constructive, eg, home visits by the police and probation service. Staff should record all interventions with a systematic analysis of what they are intended to achieve, how they will be enforced, and why they are a suitable way of managing the risk posed by that offender.

Effectiveness and enforceability should be given as much attention as issues of lawfulness and proportionality, bearing in mind Articles 2, 3 and 8 of the European Convention of Human Rights. For example, if a curfew is in place, the means of enforcing it should be clear and include the arrangements, in particular approved premises, for enforcing the curfew, such as unannounced curfew checks or electronic monitoring.

This may require police examination of an address to check that security and enforcement arrangements are suitable. The main types of intervention, some of which can be supported by licence conditions, court orders and other measures can be described as either restrictive or constructive:.

When an intervention is being considered, staff should consider any potentially negative consequences, ie, unintended outcomes given the context and characteristics of the offender. Restrictions on residence in a certain area can, for example, result in offenders living some distance from support systems of family and friends. This can lead to increased isolation, financial and emotional stress and decreased stability, all of which can increase risk.

An understanding is therefore required as to the impact of actions on the suspects in line with Article 8 ECHR right to respect for private and family life , balanced with the requirements to protect rights of victims under Articles 2 right to life and 3 prohibition of torture. Staff should therefore assess the potential negative consequences with the potential public protection benefits.

Police offender managers must ensure that such changes do trigger an appropriate reassessment of the risk level at which an offender is managed, and that the management plan in place to deal with that risk is fit for purpose.

Information gathering is a key police role in managing risk to protect the public and enables defensible decision making. There is a wide range of sources of information available to assist in monitoring, assessing and managing risk.

These include:. Staff should monitor several factors to identify, assess and manage risk. The relevant factors are:. Staff should consider the relevance of each factor on a case-by-case basis. All staff involved in assessing risk should be familiar with these factors and review them periodically and at specific points in the monitoring and risk management processes eg, prior to each home visit. To avoid unnecessary or high volumes of requests to these agencies, enquiries should be limited to the above areas.

In addition, accessing any DVLA driver record on the PNC will link previous records held on the licence holder and show any name changes. All forces can access driver records via the Driver Licence Validation service, but this does not have the facility to link to any existing name changes via the PNC. The PNC should, therefore, be the preferred option for research and direct liaison with the agency concerned.

Alternatively, data can always be obtained from the agencies via normal liaison channels. Officers and staff should take victims into account when assessing risk of harm, and include them in risk management plans eg, whether any particular safety measures are needed.

All victim contact documentation should be separate from the offender case file or contained in a confidential section. Decisions to involve victims and potential victims in managing offenders should be made after consultation with the relevant agencies, including the probation victim contact or liaison units. The primary concern should always be for the victim, supporting the focus of the Code of Practice for the Victims of Crime.

MOSOVO officers, should however be mindful of Article 8 and the need to balance the rights of potential victims and the suspect. Victims can be a useful source of information about offending behaviour and the risk of serious harm, particularly if they still have some connection with the offender eg, a relative. For example, a victim who has terminated all contact with the offender may find it disturbing to be asked for information about them. If an offender has access to past victims who may have useful information, the victim should be given a point of contact to pass on the information to the police.

In some circumstances, it may be appropriate to visit or meet the victim. Past victims may have registered with their local force that they wish to be contacted when an offender on indefinite notification requirements applies for a review.